Forensic Chemistry Laboratory

All substances and objects found in nature are formed by variously combining of one or more of the over 115 elements known in chemistry. It is not the right way to define substances by looking at their appearance. Substances may look similar to each other in appearance. Powdered sugar, flour and starch are similar to each other in terms of their appearance and color, however in reality, they are very different from each other. Therefore, in order to define substances, it is necessary to determine their chemical structure. This can only be achieved through chemical analysis.
The subjects that fall into the field of investigation of forensic chemistry laboratories also vary widely since all kinds of physical findings that can contribute to clarification a crime, have a unique chemical structure.
Forensic chemistry began to be part of forensic sciences from the beginning of the 20th century in correlation to the developments in chemistry and became the most important branch of this science after the World War II.
The most important of the institutions that have a function in the field of forensic chemistry are the forensic chemistry laboratories. In these laboratories, answers are sought for three fundamental questions: "What is this?", "Is there a correlation between this and the others?" and “What are the qualities of it?”. Analysis and examination techniques are generally used to elucidate the chemical structure while seeking answers to these questions.

Device Type

Device Number

Fume Hood

1

Deionized Water Device

1

Sensitive Scale

1

Reservoir

1

Local Suction Arm

2

Autoclave Steam Sterilizer

1

Chemical Cabinet

2

HPLC

1

FTIR Analyzer

1

Fluorescence Spectrophotometer

1

GC MS

1

GC Headspace+FID

1

PH Meter

1

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